Donald Trump Desecrates the CIA Memorial Wall

On January 21st, 2017, Donald Trump surprised me yet again. The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Memorial wall is one of the most understated, yet most powerful, monuments to those who have given their lives for the United States. It is a simple engraving on a marble wall. The top reads, “IN HONOR OF THOSE MEMBERS OF THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN … Continue reading Donald Trump Desecrates the CIA Memorial Wall

A Women’s March Against a Reign of Witches

On January 21, 2017, more than half a million people descended upon the National Mall in Washington, D.C. for the Women’s March on Washington. Millions more attended marches in cities around the United States and the world. The marchers came for many different reasons, from standing up for women’s rights (this was, after all, a march for women) and the rights of minorities to demanding … Continue reading A Women’s March Against a Reign of Witches

Obama Leaves Office Much More Popular Than His Successor

Barack Hussein Obama II, a man who by all accounts redefined the American political landscape, left office on Friday with an approval rating that is roughly 20-percentage points higher than that of Donald John Trump, placing him among history’s most popular outgoing presidents and his successor among the least popular incoming presidents. Two polls (one from the Washington Post-ABC News and another from CNN/ORC) peg … Continue reading Obama Leaves Office Much More Popular Than His Successor

Credit: Jenny Cestnik (Creative Commons)

A Millenial Retrospection of the Obama Years

In 2008, when I was fourteen years old, my mom took my brother and I to Denver for a rally for the Democratic nominee for president that year. He was an upstart U.S. Senator from Illinois named Barack Obama. My entire family was in love with the senator. He was charismatic, obviously intelligent, and spoke in a way that made it feel as though he … Continue reading A Millenial Retrospection of the Obama Years

Reflections on 2016 – Fighting Extremism in an Authoritarian Age

I was born in Pakistan and lived in Texas from the age of two until last year. Despite having a Muslim name, I am more likely to condemn a stranger for ordering their steak well-done or pronouncing pecan as “pee-can” than I am for the language that they pray in or the person that they believe should have succeeded Muhammad 1,400 years ago. I identify … Continue reading Reflections on 2016 – Fighting Extremism in an Authoritarian Age