Remembering Martin McGuinness: Why Peace is Worth the Sacrifice

If you want to make peace, you don’t talk to your friends. You talk to your enemies. – Moshe Dayan It is perhaps a good thing that few people today remember that terrorism was once synonymous with the Irish. But the period of conflict in Northern Ireland between 1969 and 1998, known as The Troubles, was responsible for around 3,700 deaths and 50,000 injuries in … Continue reading Remembering Martin McGuinness: Why Peace is Worth the Sacrifice

Our Know-Nothing Politics

The best analysis comes from people who are passionate but not overly emotional about the topic they analyze. I grew up in a community where a large population of the town was likely undocumented. I went to college with a not insignificant number of students who were not in the country legally. I have made good friends, bitter rivals, and acquaintances I know almost nothing … Continue reading Our Know-Nothing Politics

Local Policy as a Haven for the Politically Disenchanted

For those who do not know me outside of this blog, I work in local policy. My day-to-day job is anchored in the world of economic development, a world that I have thoroughly enjoyed devoting myself to over the past five months. The contrast between the progress that we have been able to achieve in my hometown and the regression that many of us have … Continue reading Local Policy as a Haven for the Politically Disenchanted

Donald Trump is No LBJ

The National Review recently published an article¬†–a bit of amateur history written by John Fund, whose National Review byline brags that he is the author of Stealing Elections: How Voter Fraud Threatens Our Democracy (I do not mean to level an ad hominem attack, I simply wish to point out that there are some pundits whose arguments lack, shall we say, ethos). Mr. Fund argues … Continue reading Donald Trump is No LBJ