Immigration Continues to Fuel Linguistic Diversity in America’s Cities

The United States is becoming more linguistically diverse. This trend is a precarious one, and far from uniform across the country, but it has the potential to have a significant impact on our society. The American Community Survey, the Census Bureau’s annual demographic survey, tracks a number of statistics — to include those that help us measure linguistic diversity. It publishes one-year estimates (collected over … Continue reading Immigration Continues to Fuel Linguistic Diversity in America’s Cities

Local Policy as a Haven for the Politically Disenchanted

For those who do not know me outside of this blog, I work in local policy. My day-to-day job is anchored in the world of economic development, a world that I have thoroughly enjoyed devoting myself to over the past five months. The contrast between the progress that we have been able to achieve in my hometown and the regression that many of us have … Continue reading Local Policy as a Haven for the Politically Disenchanted

Obama Leaves Office Much More Popular Than His Successor

Barack Hussein Obama II, a man who by all accounts redefined the American political landscape, left office on Friday with an approval rating that is roughly 20-percentage points higher than that of Donald John Trump, placing him among history’s most popular outgoing presidents and his successor among the least popular incoming presidents. Two polls (one from the Washington Post-ABC News and another from CNN/ORC) peg … Continue reading Obama Leaves Office Much More Popular Than His Successor

The Democratic Party Is Not the Party in Need of a Post-Election “Autopsy”

It has become something of a tired cliche of our political culture: after losing a presidential election, the losing party is supposed to begin with the process of “soul searching”, “introspection”, or other similar metaphorical exercises. After all, if only their coalition and/or candidate had been more XYZ, they totally would have won the election. In the immediate aftermath of the 2016 presidential campaign, conventional … Continue reading The Democratic Party Is Not the Party in Need of a Post-Election “Autopsy”

Why I Love America: A Reflection Fifteen Years On

It was a sunny day in San Antonio fifteen years ago. I was ten years old. I remember being picked up from school by my grandmother, who was fraught with worry. I can’t recall the exact details of that conversation, but I remember the words “twin towers” sticking out in my mind. Was that in New York? You see, as a fifth grader, my conception … Continue reading Why I Love America: A Reflection Fifteen Years On

The GOP Has a National Electoral Problem

There’s a reason why Republicans far and wide have been lining up for years to heap praise upon former president Ronald Reagan. It’s not just because he’s a charming pseudo-cowboy-esque actor turned politician, although that undoubtedly plays a huge role in his widespread appeal. No, Ronald Reagan embodies more than just a man’s man, he represents a political party, and a very successful one at … Continue reading The GOP Has a National Electoral Problem

Is Donald Trump a Conservative?

The Republican nominee is like nothing we’ve seen in any election. His rhetoric is widely perceived as divisive, drawing large numbers of disenchanted voters to the polls all the while alienating women, minorities, and traditional core GOP constituencies. This has led many in the Republican establishment to repudiate his conservative credentials, dismissing him as an electoral fluke rather than the sanctioned standard bearer for modern-day … Continue reading Is Donald Trump a Conservative?