The Mischief of Congress: An Analysis

Less than three weeks after being introduced, the American Health Care Act of 2017 — Congress’ alternative to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 — was,  for all intents and purposes, dead. This is a major legislative defeat for President Trump and the Republican Congress, to say the least. This measure failed because Congress as an institution was specifically designed to kill … Continue reading The Mischief of Congress: An Analysis

Remembering Martin McGuinness: Why Peace is Worth the Sacrifice

If you want to make peace, you don’t talk to your friends. You talk to your enemies. – Moshe Dayan It is perhaps a good thing that few people today remember that terrorism was once synonymous with the Irish. But the period of conflict in Northern Ireland between 1969 and 1998, known as The Troubles, was responsible for around 3,700 deaths and 50,000 injuries in … Continue reading Remembering Martin McGuinness: Why Peace is Worth the Sacrifice

Donald Trump is No LBJ

The National Review recently published an article –a bit of amateur history written by John Fund, whose National Review byline brags that he is the author of Stealing Elections: How Voter Fraud Threatens Our Democracy (I do not mean to level an ad hominem attack, I simply wish to point out that there are some pundits whose arguments lack, shall we say, ethos). Mr. Fund argues … Continue reading Donald Trump is No LBJ

Those Who Single out Islam Don’t Understand Terrorism

“Nothing is easier than to denounce the evildoer; nothing is more difficult than to understand him.” – Fyodor Dostoevsky The average person might be surprised to find out that George Habash, the founder of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), was an Orthodox Christian. Sirhan Sirhan, the Palestinian nationalist who killed Robert Kennedy, was also a Christian. So was PFLP leader Wadie … Continue reading Those Who Single out Islam Don’t Understand Terrorism

Reflections on 2016 – Fighting Extremism in an Authoritarian Age

I was born in Pakistan and lived in Texas from the age of two until last year. Despite having a Muslim name, I am more likely to condemn a stranger for ordering their steak well-done or pronouncing pecan as “pee-can” than I am for the language that they pray in or the person that they believe should have succeeded Muhammad 1,400 years ago. I identify … Continue reading Reflections on 2016 – Fighting Extremism in an Authoritarian Age

The Democratic Party Is Not the Party in Need of a Post-Election “Autopsy”

It has become something of a tired cliche of our political culture: after losing a presidential election, the losing party is supposed to begin with the process of “soul searching”, “introspection”, or other similar metaphorical exercises. After all, if only their coalition and/or candidate had been more XYZ, they totally would have won the election. In the immediate aftermath of the 2016 presidential campaign, conventional … Continue reading The Democratic Party Is Not the Party in Need of a Post-Election “Autopsy”